Plastic Roofing to the Rescue

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But for the sake of Mitch, I plunged into homelessness and gradually grew to become a world-class expert on the virtues of plastic roofing. Without plastic roofing in all its incarnations, I might not have survived my years of wandering homeless in faraway places.

My original encounter with plastic roofing occurred when Mitch and I shared a leaky two-man tent, keeping out the worst of the English rains with a plastic tarpaulin. But even that rudimentary plastic roofing could not compensate for the fact that any tent, when rained on, will eventually soaked with condensation. That’s why you should avoid touching the sides of your tent during wet weather.

One of the failings of plastic roofing is that it requires daily checks for new tears. While keeping duct tape handy will often provide a cheap and quick, if temporary, fix to these tears, duct tape will only work on clean, dry plastic roofing. Plastic roofing, through no fault of its own, seldom remains clean and dry for long.

Our tent was quite comfy and cozy in fine weather, but from October to May, it was obvious to us both that we needed more substantial shelter. Mitch did not qualify for public housing, so we were left to construct what passed for a house on a tiny plot of wooded land which was kept from being developed by a legal dispute.

Plastic Roofing And Our House

Lovingly referred to as a “bender” in colloquial English, our home resembled a miniature version of a Native American long house. Framed in green wood from saplings, its roof was assembled from scraps of whatever we could find, around a smoke hole through which we intended to run the smokestack from a wood burning stove.

We found, however, that the only way to keep the bender weather tight was to put a thick underlayer of plastic roofing beneath the outer roofing materials, most of which where surplus Army tents. Their camouflage fabric was perfect for our location!

Plastic Roofing And Our Greenhouse

Our housing problem addressed, Mitch and I then turned to growing our own food for sustenance. That, of course, meant we needed a greenhouse, and once again, some clear plastic Roofing, a discarded desk, and some handmade wooden arches proved more than adequate. Our makeshift greenhouse actually got warm enough in its interior to feel quite tropical. The day I departed Merry Olde England, the greenhouse was still functioning, and our bender sheltered me for a year after I said farewell to Mitch. Plastic roofing, I am forever in your debt!

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Source by Philip Keon